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ZZ Plant

by James
(London)

A month and a half ago (or even more) I got this little cutting of Zamioculca zamiifolia and since it’s been in water to root. But no root has appeared yet. What should I do?

Comments for ZZ Plant

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Nov 30, 2020
Not a fan...
by: Jacki Cammidge, Certified Horticulturist

I'm not a fan of rooting plant cuttings in water, for several reasons. With ZZ, this is a drought tolerant plant, and it's not evolved to have lots of water. The tendency is to rot.

The second reason is that the roots that do develop in water don't always adapt well to being in soil, when the time comes to make the move.

However, my research shows that a lot of people have good success using this method, which can be used on stems, leaves, and even leaflets, which leads me to believe that this is a very adaptable plant.

There are indications that this can take anywhere from several weeks to a year to produce roots and the funny tubers that these plants grow. So you need to be patient and give it more time.

Make sure to change the water periodically. I would not use tap water, if possible. Use bottled water which has less additives that could adversely affect the rooting process.

More information here.

Nov 30, 2020
Médium?
by: James

What medium should I use then? Should I take it out and let it callus? Now that I think about it it went straight into water (also it’s rainwater)

Nov 30, 2020
Use regular potting soil...
by: Jacki

Use regular pasteurized potting soil mixed with some kind of grit (pumice, turkey grit etc) or, cactus mix. Don't try to callous it, it's too late for that and it will just die.

Rainwater is ideal.

Dec 01, 2020
Just soil?
by: James

Omg really? I thought that’d be a bad idea! So I just put it in soil and that’s it? That easy?

Dec 01, 2020
Done!
by: James

So I just put it in a mix of coco coir with potting soil, perlite and sand. And I dipped the end in rooting powder. How often should I water it, and what should I expect from here on? Also is there a way of donating? I feel cheeky asking for advice for free!

Dec 01, 2020
From what I can gather...
by: Jacki

From what I can gather, rooting hormone isn't needed, but too late now. The thing to watch for is yellowing of the leaves which will mean that the hormone is too strong, by which time it may be too late.

Water carefully - there is no way to tell you 'how often' because every situation is different. Use how moist the soil is to tell you when. Poke a finger into the soil - if it's still damp, don't water. It's better to underwater than over water.

And thank you so much for your lovely thought - I don't have a place to donate, although I do have e-books(look in the navigation bar at the top of the page).

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Hi again!

by Meh
(Uk)

So... do you remember this plant? I followed your advice and I repotted it, and now it’s looking like this (probably because I put the rooting powder oops 🤭) but yeah, she’s still green but kinda yellow and somehow droopy but firm. Should I give up all hope? Hahahahah

I just really want a ZZ plant

Comments for Hi again!

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Dec 21, 2020
Never give up!
by: Jacki Cammidge, Certified Horticulturist

Yes, I agree that the hormone could possibly have caused the yellowing. I would wait until there is absolutely no chance of it recovering, to give up on it.

Meanwhile, water it, carefully, to try and dilute the hormone (did you use powder, or liquid?) but don't soak it, which will just cause it to rot.

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