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Sick Aeonium :'(

by Matthew
(South Salem, NY, USA)

Dear Jacki,

I hope you can help my friend. I have what I believe to be a sick aeonium. I think it may have a fungus on the leaves? There are brown spots on the bottoms and they are falling off much faster than they are growing, there are very few leaves left... before I found this page I pulled off a few of the lower leaves that seemed to be infected to prevent it from spreading to the new growth.

I started it from a cutting years ago and it has been growing in my windowsill for years. I live in NY and now that I found your page, and finally found its name, I assume it might be a bit cold which is why it never produced shoots. A few months ago I repotted it with fresh soil (along with all of my other friends) because of a mealy bug infestation. It has never looked this sad before, even during the winter months.

Thank you for your consideration.

Warmly,
Matthew

Comments for Sick Aeonium :'(

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Nov 14, 2021
Aeonium
by: Jacki Cammidge, Certified Horticulturist

Aeonium need perfect conditions, all the time. They will not suffer through low light levels, cool temperatures or our foolishness. They are completely unique among succulents.

It looks to me like this one needs more light, as well as a slightly warmer environment. Think 'Canary Islands' which is where they originate. If you can make your plant think you live in California, all the better.

Also keep in mind that the light is longer in day length closer to the equator, and the only way to emulate that is with a grow light on a twelve hour timer.

Ideally, you would propagate the older plant before the death spiral begins (those long stems, a flower) so that you have one or more to take over, but don't go and do that here. Wait for spring, and see if it survives the winter.

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