Flag of UkraineGet your information about the war in Ukraine from CNN and other trusted sources!

#StandWithUkraine

Visitors to this site know that I normally don't get involved with political issues, but this is not normal.

Please help to support Ukraine against the bullying tactics of a huge neighboring country.

About ground coverings in shade in zone 6b

by Denise
(Charleroi, Pennsylvania, USA)

Ajuga 'Gunsel Blue

Ajuga 'Gunsel Blue"

Hello. I need a ground cover that stays very short, grows in shade and I need to know how deep I need to put edging in the ground to keep it from growing into the mean neighbor's yard, please?

I was looking at Vinca minor in hopes it would stay on the short side opposed to 6 inches tall. I was curious about chicks and hens too. I need as low maintenance as possible. Do not care if it takes 2 or 3 yrs to fill in blank areas and I like short so creatures cannot hide in it. Can ya comment as well as make recommendations.

Thank you.

PS. I have no pics but basically we are talking about 9 ft wide 25 feet long side yard to my house that is currently grass that this single female with health issues no longer wants to have to cut every 10 days or pay somebody else to do it. Thanx again.

Denise

Comments for About ground coverings in shade in zone 6b

Click here to add your own comments

Mar 28, 2022
No Vinca!
by: Jacki Cammidge, Certified Horticulturist

If non aggressiveness is a crucial characteristic, stay away from Vinca! That stuff, gorgeous though it is, is a thug. It will try to take over the world, not only with its crawling, self-rooting tendrils, but by seed as well. Yes, it's free from care, but your neighbor won't be happy with you.

Your other choice of hens and chicks, or Sempervivvum, won't like growing in the shade, and will struggle to survive, let alone fill in the gaps.

I suggest Ajuga, which is not aggressively spreading, and thrives in the shade. You most likely will need an edging, around six inches deep, to keep it contained, but it's slow growing and only gets established after several seasons. As you can see from the picture, the flowers are spikes and are a bit taller, but the leaves are very low to the ground.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Ask the Horticulturist.