Ghost Plant of Mexico

Graptopetalum are another member of the Crassulaceae family – the same group that includes Sedum, Sempervivum, Echeveria and (of course) Crassula among others.

Graptopetalum, the Ghost Plant of Mexico

 In Canada?  Need Succulents?

Click here to order!

They are very closely related to Echeveria, so close in fact that they can cross breed and form x Graptoveria varieties.

The 'x' in the name denotes an inter-generic cross, a hybrid of two genera, not two species of the same genus as most hybrids.

With the genetic collaboration of these two genera, there are many new forms that combine with all the other Crassulacean members in container collections, crafts and succulent gardens.

For care, they require well drained soil, and most thrive in full sun in cooler areas, and a bit of shade in the afternoon in really hot summers.  They are frost tender and grown as a house plant for the winter if the winters are cold.

Here are a few of the most well known Graptopetalum species and varieties:

Graptopetalum pentalum ‘Superbum’; Dark mauve over laid with a thick waxy bloom, this plant almost looks white, unless the pruinose is damaged by handling.

The tendency to extremely flat growth gives this a squat low appearance over time.

Each leaf is pointed, but overlaps its neighbors to form a flat disk, looking very much like a zinnia bloom.


Graptopetalum paraguyanse; Ghostlike pale gold and green pointed chubby leaves give this plant the appearance of a cluster of roses. The pruinose or powdery coating changes the appearance to a mauve blue.

This plant has a tendency to form really long stems, which can sometimes look snake like, each topped with the pretty flower like rosette. Cascading over the edge of a container, this plant is spectacular all on its own, or combined with many other similar forms in a succulent planter.

Graptopetalum specie

There are also some of the x Graptoveria hybrids such as x Graptoveria ‘Debbie’ and x Graptoveria ‘A Grim One’.

These are found more often in avid succulent gardeners’ collections, and many times in crafts and passed around in swaps, as they are easy to propagate and grow.

The white waxy 'bloom' is easy to rub off with even just the most casual of handling - don't worry, it does grow back and it won't hurt the plant.  It's there to protect it from intense sunlight. In lower light situations, it may need to live under a grow light to keep the bloom from disappearing altogether.

The best way to propagate the Graptopetalum group is to behead the overgrown plants, leaving the long stems behind. The new rosette is planted singly, or in groups of others to form a beautiful carpet of lush growth.

Care is similar to Echeveria; see the page on how to grow Echeveria for some hints and tips, and succulent care for an overview.

Keep an eye out for some of these great additions to your succulent collection; easy to grow and forgiving of neglect, in fact, thriving on it, they make perfect started plants – get your friends hooked on the succulent hobby, so you can trade back and forth.

See what other visitors have said about Graptopetalum...

Every link will open a new page with more...

Succulent identification please???  
I'm not sure what this succulent is . Just got it from my dad. He doesn't know either.

I got this plant from my sister. I am pretty sure it is Echeveria, but can not determine anything further on the proper name of the plant. Grows on a …

Pink flowered Succulent 
This is a small (4-inch pot) succulent with showy pink flowers. The others at the garden center I brought this at had more of these with more flowers on …

My Unhappy Succulent 
A friend gave me part of her plant and it grows really fast but it seems sad. I think because it is inside and hasn't got a lot of sun in the past few …

cute asparagus-like plant 
i saw this at a friend's place and want to know what it is. please help me id this plant.

Green, Purple, Dusty Succulent Plant  
I found the plant attached to its stem, along with one other one identical to it. It was coming off of a tall stone wall. Refer to Picture 1 for its …

Mystery succulent 
any ideas?

Graptopetalum paraguayense 
I've never seen it flower, taken from a stem cutting from the UC Davis Campus. Tolerates cold to 28F well. They have the white 'bloom' powder on them. …

tiny little "starters" 
I have had these tiny plants for about six months. They haven't grown much at all. Their roots are shallow and short, they don't like to stay potted. I …

Enjoy some more lovely plants here: (click each one to find out more)

More great succulents

Want your succulents to survive the winter?  Learn how to bring them indoors and be happy and healthy with this free e-course;  Fill in your name and email address on the form below to enroll!

Winterizing Succulents E-Course

Winterizing Succulents E-Course - click here to sign up...

How can I keep my Succulents happy for the winter? Find out here!

Please note that all fields followed by an asterisk must be filled in.

Please enter the word that you see below.


Custom Search

Hardy Succulents

Tender Succulent Plants

Succulent Plants Miscellaneous



Question or Comment?

Your comments make me smile - tell me something in the box below...